Does Sildenafil (Viagra) Help Premature Ejaculation?

Kristin Hall, FNP
Medically reviewed by Kristin Hall, FNP Written by Our Editorial Team Last updated 8/30/2020

Almost 40 percent of men will deal with premature ejaculation (PE) at some point in life, making it one of the most common male sexual issues. 

Premature ejaculation can be a difficult experience, affecting everything from self confidence to interest in sex. Healthcare providers may prescribe SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors — a class of medicines commonly used to treat depression) to treat recurrent cases of PE. 

Our Premature Ejaculation 101 guide covers these treatments in more detail, as well as the main causes of PE in men. 

Right now, there’s no conclusive evidence that sildenafil stops premature ejaculation like there is for SSRI medications. However, studies show that sildenafil does have several effects that could be useful in treating PE and improving male sexual performance. 

Below, we’ve examined the scientific studies of sildenafil as a potential treatment for premature ejaculation. If you experience PE, the data below could be of use in helping you find a long-term solution that increases your time to ejaculation and improves PE-related symptoms.

Sildenafil and Premature Ejaculation: The Data

Sildenafil, which was originally designed as a medication for hypertension, is best known as the active ingredient in Viagra®. 

As a result of this, most of the scientific studies of sildenafil focus on its benefits as a treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED).

Luckily, there are two studies of sildenafil as a possible treatment for premature ejaculation, both of which provide slightly different results.

In the first study, 180 men with primary premature ejaculation were divided into three groups. The first group (Group A) was treated with 50mg of sildenafil, while people in Group B received a 20mg daily dose of paroxetine, an SSRI commonly used to treat PE.

People in the third group (Group C) were not given any medication, but were instructed to use the squeeze technique to reduce sensitivity during sex. 

The researchers followed up with study participants after six months. People in Group A (the group given sildenafil) experienced an improvement in intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, intercourse satisfactory score and PE grade.

Members of the sildenafil group also reported having sex more frequently, suggesting that the medication’s effects on PE also increased sexual confidence and interest.

The study concluded that sildenafil is “very effective and safe to treat PE,” with “much higher efficacy than paroxetine and the squeeze technique.”

In the second study, men between the ages of 18 and 65 with diagnosed premature ejaculation were given sildenafil in a placebo-controlled, double-blind environment. The men in the sildenafil group were instructed to use the medication over the course of eight weeks.

After the trial period, men in the sildenafil group experienced an increase in IELT (intervaginal ejaculation latency time) and an improvement in VTS-ELT (vibrotactile stimulation ejaculatory latency time) compared to the placebo group.

It’s worth noting that while these scores improved, neither were statistically significant. 

Men in the sildenafil group also reported a significant increase in ejaculatory control, ejaculatory confidence and overall sexual satisfaction. They also had a shorter refractory time — the amount of time required to develop an erection for the second time after ejaculating.

Overall, the study concluded that sildenafil “increased confidence, the perception of ejaculatory control and overall sexual satisfaction” compared to placebo, as well as reduced the refractory time required to achieve a second erection.

In Conclusion

While there isn’t a wealth of research into sildenafil as a treatment for PE, the available studies show promising results. 

Sildenafil increases intervaginal ejaculation latency time and sexual satisfaction, meaning it can potentially help you last longer in bed and enjoy sex more.

In both studies, men that used sildenafil also reported higher levels of sexual confidence. Since a declining interest in sex and a reduction in sexual confidence are common effects of PE, this is a very good sign.

However, it’s also worth noting that much more research needs to be done before anything can be said definitively.

On the whole, while sildenafil may not be designed as a treatment for premature ejaculation, it may possibly be effective. If you frequently experience PE and think sildenafil may be able to help you, talk to your healthcare provider. 

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.