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Does Finasteride Work For a Receding Hairline?

Does Finasteride Work For a Receding Hairline?

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Used by millions of men worldwide, finasteride (which is widely known as Propecia) is one of the few proven medications on the market for preventing and, in some cases, reversing hair loss.

Finasteride does this by reducing levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body, the hormone that’s responsible for hair follicle miniaturization and male pattern baldness. Over time, DHT can damage your hair follicles, resulting in long-term hair loss.

All of the hairs you lose due to male pattern baldness are affected by DHT. The exceptions are the hair follicles on the sides and back of your head (the “horseshoe” baldness pattern), which tend to be more resistant to DHT than the ones around the front, top and crown.

Since finasteride works by reducing total DHT levels, it should logically prevent you from losing hair around your hairline.

However, the prescribing information for finasteride mostly focuses on its ability to prevent hair loss on the crown and top of the head. In this guide, we’ll look at the science behind finasteride and explain how and why it’s also an effective treatment for stopping a receding hairline.

Receding Hairlines and DHT: The Science

Finasteride works by inhibiting the production of 5α-Reductase, an enzyme that converts your body’s testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (more commonly known as DHT).

DHT is the primary hormone that causes hair loss in men. Some men are more sensitive to DHT than others, which is why not everyone begins to lose their hair at the same time, or at the same speed.

Hair loss can start at the hairline, at the crown or on top of the head. The area in which you start to lose hair is determined by your genetics -- in some men, the hair around their hairline are the most sensitive to DHT, while in others, the area around the crown starts to thin first.

Finasteride isn’t selective when it comes to blocking DHT. Instead of affecting a specific part of your scalp or blocking a specific type of hair loss, it will block DHT at its source. This means that finasteride should slow or stop hair loss and potentially regrow some hair regardless of your specific balding pattern.

Scientific studies tend to back this up. One study from 1999 found that finasteride “slowed hair loss and increased hair growth” in men with frontal scalp thinning (in short, men with hair loss around their hairline).

Over the course of one year of continuous treatment with 1mg of finasteride per day (the typical finasteride dose for hair loss prevention), study participants showed a significant increase in hair count in the frontal scalp. These results continued in the second year of finasteride use.

Finasteride is also scientifically proven to prevent hair loss at the vertex scalp (the area on top of your head, slightly behind your hairline), making it a potential option if you’d like to stop hair loss around your hairline from worsening.

In one 1998 study, men with male pattern hair loss experienced a slowed rate of hair loss and a measurable increase in hair at the vertex scalp, with the average hair count increasing from 876 at the beginning of the study to 1,014, measured in a 1-inch diameter circular area (5.1 cm2) of balding vertex scalp, after two years of finasteride usage at 1mg per day.

Can Finasteride Stop a Receding Hairline and Regrow Hair?

Everyone is different, so this question is a tough one to answer. As a general rule, the best way to think of finasteride is as a form of protection against further hair loss, not as a way to regrow hair that you’ve already lost.

However, study data does show that finasteride can regrow hair. 83% of finasteride users stop losing hair as a result of using the medication, while about 65% of men regrew some hair as a result of taking finasteride. The amount of regrowth men experience varies and is unpredictable.

Now, does this mean that finasteride will completely restore your receding hairline? Probably not, especially if you’ve had a receding hairline for some time and have gone completely bald. However, it could result in some level of regrowth in areas where you’ve only recently started to notice thinning and recession. This is why doing something about your hair loss while still have some hair is so important.

Prevention Is Much More Effective Than Denial

Finasteride, like minoxidil, was approved for use as a hair loss prevention medication primarily through tests on the scalp and crown. This is why it’s a little tough to find information on how it can prevent hair loss around the hairline.

However, both scientific data and a mountain of anecdotal evidence shows that finasteride can and often does produce improvements to the hairline, ranging from regrowth to a slowdown of further hair loss.

Finasteride also tends to beat other hair loss treatments in efficacy tests. For example, a study comparing finasteride to topical minoxidil found that finasteride resulted in dense hair regrowth in 80% of users, compared to 52% for minoxidil.  

If you have a receding hairline, finasteride is definitely worth considering. The long-term results are legit and reliable, making it one of the most effective tools in your arsenal for preventing hair loss and improving the thickness and density of the hairline you already have.

This article was reviewed by Ho Anh, MD.

Important Safety Information

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Finasteride is for use by MEN ONLY and should NOT be used by women or children.

Read this Patient Information before you start taking Finasteride and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment.

What is Finasteride?

Finasteride is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of male pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia).

It is not known if Finasteride works for a receding hairline on either side of and above your forehead (temporal area).

Finasteride is not for use by women and children.

Who should not take Finasteride?

Do not take Finasteride if you:

  • are pregnant or may become pregnant. Finasteride may harm your unborn baby.
    • Finasteride tablets are coated and will prevent contact with the medicine during handling, as long as the tablets are not broken or crushed. Females who are pregnant or who may become pregnant should not come in contact with broken or crushed Finasteride tablets.
    • If a pregnant woman comes in contact with crushed or broken Finasteride tablets, wash the contact area right away with soap and water. If a woman who is pregnant comes into contact with the active ingredient in Finasteride, a healthcare provider should be consulted. If a woman who is pregnant with a male baby swallows or comes in contact with the medicine in Finasteride, the male baby may be born with sex organs that are not normal.
  • are allergic to any of the ingredients in Finasteride. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in Finasteride.

    What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Finasteride? Before taking Finasteride, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have any other medical conditions, including problems with your prostate or liver

    Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

    Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

    How should I take Finasteride?

  • Take Finasteride exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • You may take Finasteride with or without food.
  • If you forget to take Finasteride, do not take an extra tablet. Just take the next tablet as usual.

    Finasteride will not work faster or better if you take it more than once a day.

    What are the possible side effects of Finasteride?

  • decrease in your blood Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) levels. Finasteride can affect a blood test called PSA (Prostate-Specific Antigen) for the screening of prostate cancer. If you have a PSA test done you should tell your healthcare provider that you are taking Finasteride because Finasteride decreases PSA levels. Changes in PSA levels will need to be evaluated by your healthcare provider. Any increase in follow-up PSA levels from their lowest point may signal the presence of prostate cancer and should be evaluated, even if the test results are still within the normal range for men not taking Finasteride. You should also tell your healthcare provider if you have not been taking Finasteride as prescribed because this may affect the PSA test results. For more information, talk to your healthcare provider.

  • There may be an increased risk of a more serious form of prostate cancer in men taking finasteride at 5 times the dose of Finasteride.

    The most common side effects of Finasteride include:

  • decrease in sex drive
  • trouble getting or keeping an erection
  • a decrease in the amount of semen

    The following have been reported in general use with Finasteride:

  • breast tenderness and enlargement. Tell your healthcare provider about any changes in your breasts such as lumps, pain or nipple discharge.
  • depression;
  • decrease in sex drive that continued after stopping the medication;
  • allergic reactions including rash, itching, hives and swelling of the lips, tongue, throat, and face;
  • problems with ejaculation that continued after stopping medication;
  • testicular pain;
  • difficulty in achieving an erection that continued after stopping the medication;
  • male infertility and/or poor quality of semen.
  • in rare cases, male breast cancer.

    Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

    These are not all the possible side effects of Finasteride. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA1088.

    How should I store Finasteride?

  • Store Finasteride at room temperature between 59˚F to 86˚F (15˚C to 30˚C).
  • Keep Finasteride in a closed container and keep Finasteride tablets dry (protect from moisture).

    Keep Finasteride and all medicines out of the reach of children.

    General information about the safe and effective use of Finasteride.

    Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in this Patient Information. Do not use Finasteride for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Finasteride to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.